Effective Alkane Carbon Number

Quick Start

To use HLD we need the oiliness of our oil, its EACN. We might be able to find it in the list below. We might be able to measure it. But it it's a mixture, or if we want to tune the oiliness rationally, then we need to calculate the value of the mixture. Easy! It's the weight-based average of the individual oils.

EACN

EACN1
EACN2
Oil1 Wt%
EACN

Surfactant Science Emulsion Hydrophilic Lipophilic Difference HLD EACN We need to be able to characterise each oil with a number in order to do the HLD calculations. For hexane, heptane, octane etc. it is easy to assign a number: just use the number of carbon atoms in the oil, so 6, 7, 8, ...

But if you take cyclohexane which has six carbons it doesn't behave at all like hexane. In fact it behaves as if it has just 3 carbons. Of course it doesn't behave like propane gas (which has 3 carbons), but in all calculations, if you say that cyclohexane has an Effective Alkane Carbon Number = 3 everything works out fine. If you take benzene which still has 6 carbon atoms, it behaves like an oil with 0 carbons, its EACN = 0. And some chlorinated solvents behave as if they have negative numbers of carbons. Dichlorobenzene with 6 carbons and 2 chlorines has an EACN = -5.

One attempt to estimate EACN from a structure is provided at the excellent Pirika EACN estimator site, using Hansen Solubility Parameters (an estimator is also included in Hansen Solubility Parameters in Practice) at the heart of the estimation. But the scheme is based on correlations of data of variable quality and is only a general guide.

We often don't have a single oil. Fortunately, it is easy to blend oils to form a new EACN value, using the (% weight) weighted average of the two values, as calculated above.

Here is a list of EACN values taken from the HLD-NAC software. Many of these values come from the team of Prof Aubry at U. Lille, France. Their meticulous measurements of high-purity systems are a gold-standard for EACN values:

Asphaltenes
1
Ethyl palmitate
6.8
Benzene
0
Glycerol tridecanoate
14
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) Adipate
9.7
Glycerol trioctanoate
12.3
1-Bbromo-3-methylpropaneb
-3.3
Heptane
7
Butylbenzene
0.4
Hexadecane
16
Butyl dodecanoate
7.2
Hexadecyl acetate
5
C10-Cyclohexane
14.5
Hexamethydisiloxane
12
C10-Phenyl
6
Hexane
6
C12-Cyclohexane
17.5
Hexyl dodecanoate
9.4
C12-Phenyl
7.9
Hexyl octanoate
6.2
C2-Cyclohexane
3.8
i-Propyl myristate IPM
7.5
C3-Cyclohexane
5.6
Isohexadecane
12
C4-Cyclohexane
7
Limonene
7
C8-Phenyl
3.8
Maltenes
6
Canola, Soy, etc.
18
Menthane
6
CCl4
0
Methylene chloride
-14
Cetiol-S
17
Myristyl propanoate
6.8
1-Chlorodecane
3.5
Naphthalene
1
1-Chlorododecane
5.6
1-Octadecene
14.2
Chloroform
-14
Octane
8
1-Chlorotetradecane
8
1-Octene
3.9
1-Chlorohexadecane
9.8
Octyl octanoate
8.1
Corn Oil
16
1-Octyne
-1.8
Cyclodecane
5.5
Paraffin
18
Cyclohexane
3
Phenyl-1-butyne
-3.3
Cyclooctane
4.1
Pinane
3
cis-Cyclooctene
1.6
Squalane
24
cis-Decalin
5.3
Squalene
16
Decane
10
Styrene
3
1-Decene
5.5
Sunflower Oil
14
Decyl butyrate
5
Tetrachloroethylene
2.9
Dibutyl Ether
3.4
1-Tetradecyne
3.5
1-Decyne
0.1
Toluene
1
o-Dichlorobenzene
-5
Tricaprin
13
Dodecane
12
Trichloroethylene
-3.8
1-Dodecene
8.1
Trilaurin
16
1-Dodecyne
2
Trimyristin
19
Ethyl decanoate
2.3
Triolein
22
Ethyl dodecanoate
3.8
Tripalmitin
22
Ethyl myristate
5.3
Tristerin
25
Ethyl oleate
7
p-Xylene
-2.3

Now you are clear about EACN values, click on the Cc link to learn about Cc values for individual surfactants.